Restless Roaming Retirees Relocating to Redmond

House Hunters - The Whelan on Walkabout Episode

We don’t watch much television, but when we do, we enjoy Home and Garden Television’s (GHTV) number one show, House Hunters. 

Whelan on Walkabout wonders, “What would our House Hunters episode look like?”  Let’s see. 

From The House Hunters website

“House Hunters takes viewers behind the scenes as individuals, couples, and families learn what to look for and decide whether or not a home is meant for them. Focusing on the emotional experience of finding and purchasing a new home, each episode shows the process as buyers search for a home.”
 Restless Roaming Retirees, Keith and Cindy, are relocating to rainy Washington State. 

Restless Roaming Retirees, Keith and Cindy, are relocating to rainy Washington State. 

Narrator: Retirees Keith and Cindy have left their careers in public service and sold their home so they can travel the world.  They have decided to downsize and move into an apartment in the Puget Sound area of Washington State where their son can look for a computer programmer job. She wants open floor plan and a quiet neighborhood. He wants to stay on budget and have a close walk to services. Can these restless retirees find their next comfort zone and a job for their son in the Pacific Northwest? 

Pause for introduction logo, theme music, and a map…

 

Narrator: Restless retirees Keith and Cindy are looking to relocate to the clean and green Washington State.  Their first apartment option was listed on Craigslist; close to family and in the center of the thriving technology industry in Redmond, Washington.  But after talking to the current renter, they decided it would be better to deal directly with the Vesta Apartments rental office.  Naaz needs to show them something that meets their needs and is available next month. 

 Lake Sammamish and family are within walking distance of Vesta Apartments, Redmond, WA. 

Lake Sammamish and family are within walking distance of Vesta Apartments, Redmond, WA. 

Naaz for Vesta Apartments: So Keith and Cindy. I understand you are looking for an apartment. What kinds of things are you looking for in an apartment? 

Cindy: Well, I want a quiet location away from traffic sounds and busy roads. I like an open floor plan, and two bedrooms and two baths. We must have two bedrooms because our son, Patrick, is going to be living with us while he looks for a job in the area. 

Keith: The big thing for me is staying in budget. We are only going to be in the apartment until we can find a condominium to buy in this area. I like to take long walks, so I want to have coffee shops, services, trails, and places where we can walk. We also like to bike to places. 

 Naaz shows the Whelans a nice apartment in Redmond Washington. 

Naaz shows the Whelans a nice apartment in Redmond Washington. 

Naaz: OK. We have a lovely renovated apartment available and empty. I think it will meet most of your needs. We can take a look at it now if you want. Are you ready to go?

Cindy and Keith: You bet. We are ready. Let’s go!

Narrator: The first property the Whelan’s are looking at is a two bedroom, two bath second-floor apartment. This location is close to family and ticks all their boxes but comes at a price. 

Naaz for Vesta Apartments: Here we are. This is the place. What do you think?

Keith: Well, I was hoping for a first floor to make moving in easier, but with a second floor we don’t have neighbors dancing on our head. 

Cindy: Yes, we might want to get some help moving our furniture up the stairs. 

Naaz: Here is the first bedroom and the bathroom is across the hall. 

Cindy: This will work for Patrick. It is a bit dark, but it looks like it is about the same size of his current bedroom. And the bath across the hall works well for him. We don’t need to share a bathroom with our son.  

 Apartments. Dark and boring. 

Apartments. Dark and boring. 

Keith: And the living room is a bit dark, and there is no overhead light. 

Cindy: We have lamps. 

Naaz: And here is the kitchen. 

Cindy: Look Keith. They were expecting us. They have two glasses and a bottle of wine waiting. 

Keith: Does the apartment come with a bottle of wine? 

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Naaz: No, you will have to bring your own bottle of wine.

Cindy: Rats. I guess we can buy one for ourselves. I don’t like electric range tops, but we will never find a gas appliance in an apartment. Can you imagine a gas explosion in an apartment? Ewe. Not pretty. 

Keith: Not much counter space, but I like that it has a washer and dryer in the apartment. There is no way I would ever go back to using a coin-operated washing machine. The refrigerator is small but clean and usable.

 No gas appliances here.

No gas appliances here.

Naaz: Here is the second bedroom with two closets, and the second bathroom is en-suite. 

Cindy: It is tiny, and I don’t think our bedroom furniture is going to fit. But the bathroom is clean and nice enough. There is no shower curtain.

Keith: We can buy a shower curtain. 

Keith: It is a small bedroom. But it is an apartment. We can’t afford something that is as big as our house. And besides, this small place is already at the top of our budget. We can’t afford something bigger if we are going to travel around the world. 

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Cindy: You have a point. I do want to travel more.  

Narrator: This roaming pair has decided to downsize and simplify their lives so they can travel the world. Their first step was selling their house of 18 years. Now they are relocating to an apartment where their son can seek out his new career aspirations, and they can start roaming the world.

Narrator: The next property the Whelan’s are looking at is an apartment …

Cindy: Wait, wait. This place is good enough. If we look at other properties, it is going to cost us time and money. We don’t have much of either. And I'd rather go for a hike. 

Keith: And it is an apartment. There aren’t many choices that look any better than this one. An apartment is an apartment. 

Narrator:  But we need to have conflict, disagreement, friction, show choices, and compromise. You must make concessions. For the sake of format, you look at three places. We always have three properties, and you eliminate one, then you agree on where you will live, and then you kiss. 

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Keith: But this apartment is good enough and at the top of our budget. We also need time to fill out a renter’s application, pay the application fees, have a background search, get a money order for the first month’s rent, get approved, get renters insurance, do a walkthrough, and go home and pack our things. If we spend time looking at two more properties chances are it is going to look the same. If you have seen one apartment, you have seen them all. 

Cindy: And I'd rather go for a hike. 

Narrator: OK, ok.  But will you do the decision part? 

Keith: We can do that if it doesn’t take up too much time. 

Cindy: Then can we go on a hike? 

Narrator:  The Whelan’s have seen some excellent properties for rent in Redmond, Washington. Can these restless retirees agree on their new rental retreat?  They now have a big decision to make.

Cindy: Yes we have to make a decision. We’ll have to talk about it some more, and we’ll have to eliminate one… (getting back on script.) We have seen some great properties in this area.

Keith: Yes we have. There was the Vesta Apartment. 

Cindy: Yes. And I liked the Vesta Apartment. It was at the top of our budget but it had a great location near our family. Also it is within walking distance of Lake Sammamish and ready for us to move in next month. I think Patrick could look for jobs in this area. 

Keith: Does that mean we made our decision? I think we will go with… (pregnant pause)

 It is an apartment. What do you expect? 

It is an apartment. What do you expect? 

Both: The Vesta Apartment. 

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Couple kisses on que…

Cindy: Let's go tell Patrick that we found a new apartment to move into next month. 

Keith: Yes. And we can pay our fees and get started on all the online forms we need to fill out.  

Cindy: First, lets go on a hike. 

 The Whelans go for a hike in the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife refuge.  It was a beautiful day in Washington State. 

The Whelans go for a hike in the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife refuge.  It was a beautiful day in Washington State. 

Coming Soon: The Whelan’s “Three Months Later” scene where Whelan on Walkabout declares that they made a great decision to move to Redmond.  Soon they will travel the World. 

Watch the real HGTV House Hunters episodes at https://www.hgtv.com/shows/full-episodes 

Running on Empty

Looking out at the road rushing under my wheels
Looking back at the years gone by like so many summer fields…

Running on, running on empty
Running on, running blind
Running on, running into the sun
But I’m running behind
— Jackson Brown

Here is a link so you too can sing along. https://youtu.be/Vq25ZJwZJzU

On my fourteen-hour drive to college, I would sing along with Jackson Brown. I was 21 on "Highway 101" from Southern California to Humboldt State University.

I was living it.

I don’t know where I’m running now.
I’m just running on.
 Sold! I love my house, but I love my new life more. 

Sold! I love my house, but I love my new life more. 

"Many summer fields" have been good to me, and now that I am retired, I feel that "running behind" part.

A lot has changed since my long drives in the eighties. 

This month I am asking myself "How did I pick up all this stuff along the way?" 

I like my house, my couch, and my bathroom, and my books, and my pool, and my clothes, and my rice cooker, and my flip flops, and my artwork, and my music, and my clocks, and my bath towels, and my houseplants. I love all my stuff. 

But, they can't go with me on The Big Walkabout. Less is more. I want to get rid of more and keep less. I don't want my life limited by my possessions. 

The less I own, the more I can travel.

 My collection of Star Trek action figures was the first to go. 

My collection of Star Trek action figures was the first to go. 

What do you do with the High School Yearbook? Mom's glass figurines? Dad's old belt buckle? The necklace you got from your first love? The gifts your children gave you when they were in kindergarten? The craft project you started two years ago and haven't found time to finish? The old skis. The extra canning jars. Clothes that don't fit. Books you won't re-read. 

 "Cuppie" may be listed on eBay for $50, but no one wanted the one I inherited. It went to Goodwill. 

"Cuppie" may be listed on eBay for $50, but no one wanted the one I inherited. It went to Goodwill. 

Sooner or later, you must face it.

"You can't take it with you." 

Have you had the chance to clean up after the death of a loved one? A mother, a father, a family member passes away and their things need to be evaluated, shifted, and placed in another spot. 

It isn't pretty. It is hard. Emotionally, mentally, physically, time-consuming, life energy sucking hard. 

List it on eBay.  You get no bids. 
Post it on Craigslist.  You get spam. 
Put in on Facebook.  You get reminders to "please mark items as sold," when it hasn't sold. 
Push it onto your children. You get a twisty face look. "Mom… Really?" 
Sell it at a yard sale. You get two bucks. 
Leave it on the curb for "FREE." You get the neighbors worried that you are leaving trash on the street. 
Give it to Goodwill. You get a useless receipt and no tax benefit. 
Pack it in a box. You get to pay for a storage unit, and you still need to deal with it later. 
Or you keep things until you die and someone else must decide what to do with it. 

That is the downside of downsizing. 

 I haven't been able to sell my clarinet. 

I haven't been able to sell my clarinet. 

I cried as I cleaned out my photographs and gave away art supplies and frames. My dream for an art studio will have to wait. 

 Cleaning out my photography stuff was hard. I threw away most of my paper prints. Photographs and frames don't store well. 

Cleaning out my photography stuff was hard. I threw away most of my paper prints. Photographs and frames don't store well. 

 Boxes of empty frames. Such potential! Dumped in a bin at Good Will. 

Boxes of empty frames. Such potential! Dumped in a bin at Good Will. 

But there is an upshot that makes it all worthwile.  

 All four bicycles went to nice people who wanted them very much. 

All four bicycles went to nice people who wanted them very much. 

Sold my grandmother's sewing machine to Ruth who wanted to make rag quilts for grandbabies. 
Sold the chainsaw to someone trying to keep their tree trimming business viable. 
Sold four bicycles, all to wonderful people. 
Sold the guitar to parents who wanted is as a gift to their daughter.
Sold a clarinet to a beaming high school student. 
Sold upholstered chairs to a colorful gay couple. 
Sold my mother's rocking chair to a grandmother. 
Sold cabinet work to an interesting woman who lives in the Fresno's Tower District. 
Sold our house to a family with an infant girl and a pre-school boy. She sells textbooks from her home office, and they wanted desperately to send their children to Buchannan School Complex. 

Gotta do what you can just to keep your love alive,
Trying not to confuse it with what you do to survive.

Buying and having nice things was fun. There is nostalgia in all that stuff.  But the object isn't the memory. Life isn't about accumilating artifacts. Life is about living and collecting experiences.  

 I loved stringing beads with my daughter, but we have both moved past our Hello Kitty box of beads. 

I loved stringing beads with my daughter, but we have both moved past our Hello Kitty box of beads. 

Giving away things doesn't diminish the value it had when I needed it. It was valuable, and I am grateful for having owned my things. Selling something doesn't cancel its value. Giving something away doesn't detract from what it did for my life. Donating an object doesn't reverse its effect on my life. My memories are not dependent on objects. 

I want to live a life that looks forward, not back. I'm keeping my memories, my experience, my loves, and my life. But, I'm not holding onto stuff. I'm getting ready for the future. I'm looking forward to travels, new stories, and more good memories. 

I know in my heart that less is more, and I'm still on that road trip. 

Thank you, Jackson Brown. I'm still singing along.

"I'd love to stick around, but I'm running behind." 
 Sold the guitar. For years it sat in our garage. Now it is making music. 

Sold the guitar. For years it sat in our garage. Now it is making music. 

My Arizona Highways

A South-west Arizona Walkabout

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I am standing in the checkout line at the supermarket. 

You know that awkward moment. My orange juice, bananas, beer, and granola bars are on the counter. I have my debit card ready, and then I see it.

Not People, or Newsweek, or National Enquirer, but THE Arizona Highways Magazine. It is still in print, and it has been years since I read an issue. 

Arizona Highways has published beautiful outdoor photography for over fifty years. I remember working in the Crafton Hills College Library checking in and filing periodicals. I would scoop up Arizona Highways for my dinner break, and while my Marie Calendar’s chicken pot pie was warming in the microwave, I would pour through the colorful and poetic landscapes of Arizona.  Sweeping horizons, bright pink flowers, surreal sunsets, otherworldly rock formations, big skies, and even bigger adventures awaited in the vast open scenery of Arizona. 

 A roadrunner in Sabino Canyon. 

A roadrunner in Sabino Canyon. 

As a photographer, Arizona Highways was always the gold standard. It was the kind of thing that was at the top of your introduction list. “I would like to intorduce a wonderful  photographer who has been published in National Geographic, Popular Photography, Outdoor Photographer, Shutterbug, Click, and Arizona Highways… She is not only an amazing photographer, but also a fascinating person…”  and in my fantasy it is all about me and my photographs. 

 

 Rotting mesquite in Pagagonia State Park, 

Rotting mesquite in Pagagonia State Park, 

Alas, I have no credits to my name. Just my Big Dream and this blog. So, I am declaring this is my Arizona Highways Moment. 

This trip was my desert wildlands walkabout week through the south-west corner of Arizona. My wild west wandering partner and I started in Catalina State Park north of Tucson, south to the Mexican border, across to Organ Pipe National Park, and returned north again on our way home.

I have been to Arizona, but this trip I was able to visit several diverse desert ecosystems that I have not seen before. We were roaming the wild western landscape. 

A South-west Arizona Winter Walkabout. 


First Stop - Catalina State Park, Oro Valley, Romero Canyon Trail 

 The view in our campsite in Catalina State Park. 

The view in our campsite in Catalina State Park. 

 Sotol in Catalina State Park, Arizona. 

Sotol in Catalina State Park, Arizona. 

It is hard to believe that this quiet natural desert reserve on the western slope of the Catalina Mountains is across the street from the Oro Valley Marketplace that includes an Olive Garden, a Walmart Supercenter, and movie theater complex.  

We hiked the Romero Canyon trail. Surprisingly,  the nearby development around the park is not visible from the trail system or the campground. The campsites are designed for motorhomes of all sizes, but they are also comfortable for tent camping.

Catalina State Park is very busy In the winter and we were fortunate to get a reservation.  It is one of our favorite desert campgrounds because it is so easy to get to services and wild places. We were only able to get a site for a few days, but next time we will be making reservations well in advance.

Learn more about Catalina State Park at https://azstateparks.com/reserve/catalina/camping/   

 The Romero Canyon hike in Catalina State Park, Arizona.

The Romero Canyon hike in Catalina State Park, Arizona.

Sabino Canyon, Coronado NF, Telephone Line Hike

 Saguaro cactus decay in Sabino Canyon along the Telephone Line Trail. 

Saguaro cactus decay in Sabino Canyon along the Telephone Line Trail. 

 Take the tram or hike. It is all good in Sabino Canyon.

Take the tram or hike. It is all good in Sabino Canyon.

On the other side of the Catalina Mountains is Sabino Canyon in the Coronado National Forest. I had read about the tram and hikes in the canyon in VIA magazine, and I wanted to give it a try. For $10 you can ride the tram and either get off and hike, or enjoy the ride up and down. We took a one-way trip to the last stop at the top of the canyon, and we walked the Telephone Line trail back to the visitor center.

The hike was quiet. I like communing with native vegetation up close and personal. The good, the bad, and the ugly are all integral parts of the thriving ecosystem. 

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Whispy clouds and a dusting of snow reminded us that it was winter in the desert. This time of year, there are no flowers here. Yet, it is still beautiful. The cottonwoods, willows and many of the shrub species were without their leaves which allows  open un-interrupted views of the surrounding canyon. 

Very few people were on the trail and have been no vehicles allowed in the canyon since 1978. Tuscon is still sprawling with urban development into new areas!  It was good to see a portion of the desert ecosystem separated from the pressures of the local population explosion. 

 Rolling hills viewed from the the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center. 

Rolling hills viewed from the the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center. 

Learn more about Sabino Canyon at

 https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/coronado/recarea/?recid=75425


Patagonia Lake State Park, Bird Walk Trail

 Spring is around the corner on the Bird Trail, Patagonia  Lake State Park, AZ

Spring is around the corner on the Bird Trail, Patagonia  Lake State Park, AZ

 Not much blooming in March, but the barrel cactus had fruit at the Catalina State Park Visitor Center, Arizona. 

Not much blooming in March, but the barrel cactus had fruit at the Catalina State Park Visitor Center, Arizona. 

Patagonia Lake State Park is a man-made lake surrounded by rolling hills, mesquite trees, and grasslands. Portions are now owned by the Nature Conservancy. It has a long history as part of the railroad system associated with the led, copper, zinc and molybdenum mines in the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains.  

Judging by the number of campsites, parking sites, boat parking sites, and picnic tables, we were not there in high season. Despite being a constructed environment, this area is still an important wildlife migration area. 

I like finding a central base location to park our trailer then take day-trips out to see near-by areas. The willow and cottonwood trees were just starting to leaf out hinting at spring. It makes for an interesting landscape because you can see the structure of the trees and see through them to the surrounding areas. Some places are still too brown to enjoy. But if you are looking for birds, it is much easier to find them without the leaves on the trees.   

 Retro works in Arizona, in Patagonia State Park Campground. 

Retro works in Arizona, in Patagonia State Park Campground. 

Learn more about Patagoina State Park at  https://azstateparks.com/reserve/patagonia-lake/camping/ 

Paten Bird Preserve  

From their website: 

Wally and Marion Paton first began inviting birders into their yard shortly after moving to Patagonia in 1973. They eventually put up a canopy and set out benches, bird books, and a chalkboard for people to record their sightings. The Patons had a special vision for supporting their backyard birds with an array of feeding stations—and supporting the wider birding community by sharing the riches of their yard. After Wally passed away in 2001 and Marion in 2009, the birding community was left with an inspiring legacy upon which to build.

It is a lovely place to stop and sit on a bench and wait for the emerald flashes of Anna's hummingbird. On our visit, it was rather quiet. It didn't help that it was mid-afternoon and it was a very dry winter. Not many birds have migrated north from Mexico.

We spoke in hushed voices as we took our place to sit and wait. If you are patient, this is a great place to photograph hummingbirds and butterflies.

But, I am not a patient photographer. 

 "Look this way!" An Anna's hummingbird likes to pose for their camera, not my camera. 

"Look this way!" An Anna's hummingbird likes to pose for their camera, not my camera. 

Learn more about the Paton Hummingbird Center at http://tucsonaudubon.org/go-birding/tucson-audubons-paton-center-for-hummingbirds/ 

 

San Pedro River National Riparian Area

 Winter cottonwoods in the corridor. 

Winter cottonwoods in the corridor. 

Migrating wildlife do not recognize the Mexican border, but they do know a good travel corridor when traversing north to south, then reverse with the seasons.  

 The biggest cottonwood trees I have ever seen at San Pedro River National Riparian Area, Arizona

The biggest cottonwood trees I have ever seen at San Pedro River National Riparian Area, Arizona

 

We weren't migrating, but we did take a day trip to the San Pedro River National Riparinarian Area. This unusual area has running water all year and hasn't been sucked dry by ranches and agriculture. At least not yet. It is in danger of going dry. 

Walking under the ancient cottonwood trees I can trace the various historical river flow areas. High water marks, eroded side banks, and old channels are braided with the trail and the river. 

The riparian area is narrow and the length is impressive. It demonstrates the value of water in Arizona. I walked only a short distance and I could recognize habitat for migrating birds, coyote, deer, elk, and the other wildlife that annually make the trek up and down the river with the seasons.

But that day it was quiet. We saw few birds and no wildlife.  It wasn't hard to imagine that climate change could bring Rachael Carson's "Silent Spring" to this corridor. 

Learn more about the San Pedro River National Riparian Area at https://www.blm.gov/visit/san-pedro

Buenos Aires National Wildlife Area

 Winter grasslands make a wide open landscape in Arizona. 

Winter grasslands make a wide open landscape in Arizona. 

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I wanted to see just how big Southwest Arizona could feel, and the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Area took me way out to the Wild Wild West. 

This is cattle country. Grasslands, big skies and plenty of open space. The kind of landscape seen in a late night cowboy movie. The kind of habitat that is harsh to the visitor and vulnerable. The type of habitat that kills people trying to enter the country on foot; inhabited regions are few and far between. 

The area is accessed by driving on a dirt road or riding on a horse. The grass was dry, and the mesquite was without leaves. 

This wasn't a movie. This was the real McCoy. All I was missing was a horse and a set of spurs.

 Big grasslands at Buenos Aries National Wildlife Area, Arizona. 

Big grasslands at Buenos Aries National Wildlife Area, Arizona. 

Learn more about the Buenos Aries National Wildlife Area at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/buenos_aires/


Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

 The organ pipe cactus of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. 

The organ pipe cactus of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. 

Organ Pipe Cactus, up close and personal. 

Visiting the Organ Pipe National Monument really brought out my inner Botanist. I didn't have a plant list, and the wildflowers weren't in bloom, but I could have spent days identifying desert flora! The diversity of life was apparent even in the winter. This is the top end of the natural range for organ pipe cactus and I can only guess that there are many more species where this is their only habitat in the United States. 

 

The Monument has a 3 hour Puerto Blanco Drive tour consisting of  37 miles well groomed dirt and gravel road. On the southern end, it parallels the border for the last one-third of the drive. Some sections are one-way for the public, but we encountered Border Patrol Agents driving the opposite direction.  In this National  Monument there is no need to build a wall. Just gather up all the agents and have them stand and hold hands along the wall, and that will prevent anyone or anything from crossing.  

I would like to return sometime to hike more of this desert landscape. Alas, we only had one day. I will dream of one day returning when it becomes a National Park and the border patrol will be less of an issue.

 Yes, there is a wall along the Organ Pipe National Monument and Mexico. 

Yes, there is a wall along the Organ Pipe National Monument and Mexico. 

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Learn more about the Organ Pipe National Monument at https://www.nps.gov/orpi/index.htm

Ajo, Arizona

I think that Ajo, Arizona is an undiscovered gem.  This remote desert community is making the best of a messy situation.  It gave me second thoughts about living next to an abandoned silver mine. 

Looking at the town using Google Maps, the mine is a huge eye in the middle of the desert. An alarming view from above and unavoidable from the ground.  The mine isn't operational, but it also isn't closed. They are doing just enough to avoid rehabilitation of the area. 

 A great little Airbnb in Ajo, Arizona. 

A great little Airbnb in Ajo, Arizona. 

 

We decided to take a break from camping for a little luxury at an airbnb. Cute as a bug's ear, this rental is destined to be a snowbirds annual winter retreat.

I would return to Ajo for the culture and I hope the best for their future.  

 The artwork in Ajo, Arizona. Inspiring!

The artwork in Ajo, Arizona. Inspiring!

Learn more about Ajo at: http://www.ajochamber.com  

 "Road trip!" Arizona Highway stylin' the way it ought to be done - retro. 

"Road trip!" Arizona Highway stylin' the way it ought to be done - retro. 

Arizona is still wild with unspoiled open spaces and Arizona Highways is still a beautiful magazine. One of their regular features is “Fifty Years Ago” where they recall something from their archives.  

I was surprised that there were no ads in the magazine, and they are still published monthly.  The lack of commercialization is thanks to the Arizona Department of Transportation. Because of this, or despite this, it is still an impressive outdoor photographic magazine.  

I love you Arizona Highways. 

Learn more about Arizona Highways at: https://www.arizonahighways.com 

 Just north of Organ Pipe National Monument - the Why Not Travel Center in Why, Arizona.   

Just north of Organ Pipe National Monument - the Why Not Travel Center in Why, Arizona.   

Maybe, one day I’ll be a good enough to be published in Arizona Highways. 

Maybe, not. 

I have plenty of trips to travel, photos to take, adventures to write, and things to publish.  I guess Arizona Highways will just have to wait. Right now, I’m busy traveling and writing for Whelan on Walkabout. 

 Ending with a moonrise at Patagonia State Park, Oro Valley, Arizona. 

Ending with a moonrise at Patagonia State Park, Oro Valley, Arizona. 

 

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